Brooks

Hyperion

Brooks

Hyperion

The Brooks Hyperion line are two shoes that work in tandem with each other. One for training and one for race day. When Brooks approached TNB to edit and animate this dynamic duo of running shoes, we, of course, stepped up.

Having witnessed the glory of our 14 Hands Kentucky Derby Party integrated campaign, Brooks was excited to see what we could do for the Hyperion video. So we knuckled under and set to hand-crafting some illustrations. Holy hand grenades, we gave birth to a hell of a fun and energetic motion expansion of their existing branding!

Corporate | 3D | 2D Animation | Cel Animation | Editorial | Compositing | Color Correction

Hyperion: It’s a two fer!

Director: Bobby Hougham
ECD: Bobby Hougham
Design/Illustration: Vincent Diga, Jay Bryant
2D Animation/Compositing: Roberto Bramblia, Andy Musser, Ben Strickland, Ryan Davies
3D Modeling: Adam Rosenzweig, Marcus Kulik
Texture and Shading: Marcus Kulik
3D Animation/Match Move: Bryce Stines
Cel Animation: John Maggiora
Color Correction: Eric Edwards

Sound Design/Foley/Mix: John Buroker (HEARby)

Client: Brooks
CD: Mike Peck
Senior Design/AD: Lucas Fuentes
Senior Manager/Copy: Nikolaus Drellow
Producer: Marisa Schoen

Director: Bobby Hougham
ECD: Bobby Hougham
Design/Illustration: Vincent Diga, Jay Bryant
2D Animation/Compositing: Roberto Bramblia, Andy Musser, Ben Strickland, Ryan Davies
3D Modeling: Adam Rosenzweig, Marcus Kulik
Texture and Shading: Marcus Kulik
3D Animation/Match Move: Bryce Stines
Cel Animation: John Maggiora
Color Correction: Eric Edwards

Sound Design/Foley/Mix: John Buroker (HEARby)

Client: Brooks
CD: Mike Peck
Senior Design/AD: Lucas Fuentes
Senior Manager/Copy: Nikolaus Drellow
Producer: Marisa Schoen

The Process

The Process

Brooks supplied all the footage they had shot of the two Hyperion shoes, and we provided the rest. While they also had an illustrative look for their print and other marketing material, they hadn’t yet applied that into motion. So we developed illustrative styles that were flexible enough for multiple animation techniques. In the end, our animators pushed the illustration style to the limit while maintaining look continuity between cel, 2D, 2.5D, and 3D animation.

Building the shoes

We decided early on that we wanted to originate our transitions from the shoe in the footage. The team was going to match-move an illustrated version of the shoe to the one in the outgoing shot. While possible through traditional cel animation; however, Bobby also wanted to fly the camera around the shoes. The dynamic camera move would dramatically highlight the various components and features in the technical scenes. Consequently, we chose to develop a 3D solution.

Brooks had CAD files for the soles; however, we only had the physical prototypes for the uppers. So we built the models using a photogrammetry technique. Essentially, we shot hundreds of photos of the shoes from every possible angle on a turntable tabletop set. Then, we fed those photos into a program that figures out the shape and size of the object photographed and creates a geometric point cloud that our 3D applications can use to build the real geometry.

Once we cleaned up the point cloud, then we simplify the cad files for video use. Finally, materials are applied. And VOILA, we had our shoes ready for illustration shaders and animation.

All about that STYLE!

Even though the animation would derive from a 3D flying camera, we designed it to look familial with the 2D, 2.5D, and cel animation techniques we employed throughout the video. So we converted assets provided by our illustrator into shaders that we then applied to the shoes. Ultimately creating hand-drawn lines and fills everywhere on the shoes.

Defining the vernacular

The language for each shoe was very particular; the Tempo was the training shoe, whereas the Elite was all about speed. So we tried many different animations around each shoe to see what was working and what wasn’t. We started with a set of illustrated options, but as we started dropping them into the scenes, it became apparent what set was the most successful for each shoe.

Who says Kata doesnt apply?

As this was an extremely aggressive schedule, we had to take advantage of every hour we got. As part of the development process, our animators built a toolkit of transition elements our editor used during the rough cut phase. Ultimately these were finessed and replaced in the final compositing and conform phase.

Working with The New Blank was downright relaxing. As an uber “type A” sort of producer…for me, it was nothing less than brilliant to connect with the thoughtful, talented, organized team at TNB. Every detail of our project was considered and the final product delivered exceeded our expectations (by a mile and then some). They stayed on budget and delivered on our extremely tight schedule. Can’t say enough nice things and can’t wait to work with them again!

Marisa Schoen

Brooks

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